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  • Cathedral of St Vitus, Wenceslas and Adalbert at the Prague Castle

Cathedral of St Vitus, Wenceslas and Adalbert at the Prague Castle

Prague

Prague Castle Cathedral

The Gothic Temple, Prague Castle Cathedral, or the Cathedral of St Vitus, Wenceslas and Vojtech. People better know it under its short name “St. Vitus”. Its location is right in the heart of Prague Castle, specifically in its third courtyard. The three-nave cathedral, inspired by the French Notre Dame Cathedral, forms the closure with a chapel and a rich support system overlooking the high chorus. On the southern side stands the St. Wenceslas Chapel and the southern entrance hall with the Golden Gate.

EARLY HISTORY OF BUILDING CATHEDRAL OF ST VITUS

On November 21, 1344, Jan Lucemburský, the father of the prominent Czech monarch and Rome Emperor Charles IV, laid the foundation stone for Cathedral of St. Vitus . However, the construction  was finished 585 years later, the temple was completed in 1929. The first architect involved in the creation of this monument was Matthias of Arras He then began building the eastern chancel to be able to serve Mass as soon as possible. In the horseshoe-shaped chorus, he constructed eight chapels with the same floor plan that correspond to the field of the gallery. Matthias of Arras has built the end of the arcade corridor to the triforium and built the eastern part of the long chorus with one chapel on the north and two on the south side and in the south began building the Chapel of the Holy Cross. It  first layed separately outside the construction of the cathedral. After that in the north he started building a sacristy.

After the death of Matthias of Arras, in 1356, the construction continued under control of Petr Parléř with his Parléř’s Works. Parler firstly used an unusual net ribbed vault called the Parléřovský type.  It is actually a vaulted vault with window cuts with beautiful decorations, then even carrying ribs.. After his death in 1399, they interrupted the construction of the Saint Vitus Cathedral, since Charles IV, who was a great enthusiast of this building, did not live for over twenty years and his successors did not want longer complete the temple, the Parler’s sons were hammering the building site from the planks and the fragment of the temple closed the wall.

JAGGELONIANS

So the cathedral stayed for many years only by torso. During the reign of King Vladislav II Jagiellonian the late Gothic royal orator was built. While the authorship  attributed to the architect Benedict Ried (Rejt), the performance of Hans Spiess. It connects the cathedral with the Old Royal Palace. After the great fire of the Castle and the Lesser Quarter in 1541, which destroyed many buildings, the Western Wohlmut’s bush was built during the following repairs in 1556-1561, closing the unfinished cathedral. From 1770 comes the copper Baroque helm of the tower, where bells are also hanging.

MODERN HISTORY

The western part of the ship and facade with two 80-meter towers built between 1873 and 1929 according to the project of Josef Kranner and Josef Mocker. In September 1929, with the participation of President T. Masaryk and Archbishop František Kordač, the completion of the cathedral was completed on the occasion of the millennium of the murder of St. Wenceslas.

PRESENT

Nowadays, Cathedral of St Vitus serves as a treasure chest of Czech crown jewels. More over also as a mausoleum of 27 Czech kings and queens, buried there.  In addition, this wonderful Prague cathedral is full of sculptures and painting portraits. It is also possible to visit the cathedral tower. From there is also a beautiful view of Prague Castle and Prague.

It is definitely a building that will amaze you and you should not miss it!

 


St. Vitus Cathedral

III. nádvoří 48/2, 119 01 Praha 1, Czechia
+420 224 372 434
Now Open Now Closed Monday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Saturday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Sunday: 12:00 – 5:00 PM

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